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Apple Cultivars
   

Apples are generally not self fertile so will require a pollinator from the same or adjacent pollination group. For example:a cultivar (variety) in pollination group 3 will require a pollinator from groups 2, 3 or 4. Triploids require a pollinator from the same or adjacent pollination group but will not provide reciprocal pollination. Hence the pollinator of a triploid requires its own separate pollinator.

Please note that the flowering period of a given cultivar can vary from place to place, as can its relative position compared to other cultivars. The apple Newton Wonder is listed by some nurseries as being in flowering group 5 (in a scale running from 1 to 5), while in Martin Crawford's excelent Directory of Apple Cultivars it is in group D (in a scale running from A to H). The system employed here uses 5 groups, with group 1 being the earliest flowering.

Months listed refer to eating period. Some apples will keep considerably longer in good storage conditions.

Rootstocks

Cultivars  listed below are available on a range of different rootstocks: MM106, M116 (semi-vigorous), M25 (vigorous) or M111 (slightly less vigorous than M25 but more tolerant of waterlogging). M116 is a relatively new rootstock. It produces trees slightly smaller than MM106 but with similar crops plus greater resistance to disease.

A more limited selection of cultivars are available on dwarfing M9 rootstock (see below).

A few cultivars are available on M27 (ultra dwarfing rootstock). These rootstocks are more suited to very small gardens.

Rootstock information

 

Non-listed Cultivars

In addtion to the items listed below, we can supply many other cultivars at special request. There is a €5 surcharge per tree for special requests. Please contact us for further details.

Tree types

Maiden - Young tree
Straight Lead - Maiden grown on for further year, no side branches
Cordon - Maiden grown on for one extra year with good spur development
Bush Trained - Topped at 75cm with some side branch development
Half Standard - Topped at 1.2m with good side branch development

Prices - barerooted trees

Maidens €18; Straight leads €24; Cordons and Bush trained €24; Half Standards €30

Orchard Collection Offer

Ten or more apple trees, mixed varieties (our choice) barerooted, two to three years old special offer price €10 ea.

For customers requiring a smaller number of trees, we have the Mini-Orchard Collection Offer: Six apple trees, mixed varieties (our choice) barerooted, two to three years old special offer price €12.50 ea.

Choice of MM106, M25 or M111 roostocks. This is a great bargain (the trees normally sell at €18-26 ea) for anyone looking for set up or extend an existing orchard. We will select the mix according to customer requirements in terms of eaters, cookers or cider apples. All varieties offered are suitable for Irish conditions.

For collection from our premises from early December till April (while stocks last) or delivered to your address (normal deliver rates apply). Please contact us for further information.

Cordon Collection (NEW)

10 or more apple trees, cordon trained on M9 dwarfing rootstock, any varieties, special offer price €19.20 ea (20 percent discount)

Cider Apple Collection (NEW)

10 or more apple trees, two year straight leads on M25 rootstock, Dabinette, Morgan's Sweet, Harry Masters (any combination) , special offer price €19.20 ea (20 percent discount)

Special offer for community orchard or school projects

Community orchard collection of 12 apple trees, two or three years old with fruiting spurs mixed varieties (M25, M111 or MM106 rootstock only) €100 delivery free to any address in Republic of Ireland.

New for 2013/14

Cordon apple trees on M9 rootstock

We are offering a limited range of apple varieties on dwarfing M9 rootstock - ideal for cordons, espalliers and for the smaller garden. Price (for cordons) €24 ea.

Varieties available: Beauty of Bath (e), Charles Ross (e/c), Discovery (e), Egremont Russet (e), Fiesta (e), Greensleeves (e), Grenadier (c), Herefordshire Russet (e), Lane's Prince Albert (c), Laxton's Supurb (e), Reverend W.Wilks (c) and Sunset (e). Stock is limited so order early to avoid disappoinment.

 

Pot-grown trees

A selection of the best barerooted trees have been carefully root-pruned and have been grown on in large pots. The trees come in a variety of sizes. Prices start at €27. Please contact us for further details.

Barerooted trees - varieties

Allington Pippin
Eater. Sharp, crisp, aromatic. October to December. Resistant to scab. Can also be used for juicing and cider. Needs warm location. Unusual for apples, is partially self fertile. Pollination group 3. Lincolnshire c1880
.

Ardcairn Russet
Irish eater. Dry and sweet with slight banana flavour. September. Resistant to scab. Pollination group 3. Cork c1890
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Bardsey                                                          
Dual purpose apple discovered growing wild on Ynys Enlii (Bardsey Island). Tasty eater when fully ripe. Growing at the Sustainability Institute premises since 2005. September to October. Pollination group 2.

Beauty of Bath                                         
Small fruited sweet early eater. Very resistant to scab and partially resistant to canker. Better choice as an early eater than Irish Peach for high rainfall areas. August. Pollination group 2. Somerset c1860.

Ben's Red                                         
Eater. Sweet, crisp, with hint of strawberries and raspberries. Very resistant to scab. Produces small, spreading tree, but heavy cropping. September. Pollination group 1/2. Cornwall c1830.

Bramley's Seedling                                        
Justifiably famous cooker producing large crops of large well flavoured fruit. Hardy and vigorous. Moderately high in vitamin C (16mg/100g). Good for juice or cider production. October to March. Pollination group 3 but triplod. Nottingham 1809

Brownlee's Russet                                         
Tasty eater with ornamental blossom. Aromatic, nutty flavour. Resistant to scab and canker. October to March (excellent storage). Pollination group 2. Herefordshire 1848

Brown's                                      
Cider. Bittersharp category. Dark red fruit. Very resistant to scab. September to October. Pollination group 4. South Devon c1900

Charles Ross                                        
Dual purpose apple: sweet for easting but good for baking, cider making and juicing. Hardy and very resistant to scab. September. Pollination group 2/3. Berkshire 1890

Cornish Aromatic                                        
Old favourite with very good resistance to canker and scab. One of the most suitable varieties for high rainfall areas. October to February. Pollination group 3. Cornwall 1813

Coul Blush                                        
Cooker/Eater. Hardy and disease resistant variety from Northern Scotland. Yellow streaked with red. Juicy and crisp. September. Pollination group 2. Rosshire 1827

Court of Wick                                            
Small juicy eater. Good flavour. Resistant to scab and canker. Good for juice production. October to December. Pollination group 3

Court Pendu Plat                                           
Very old eating apple  from France dating back to medieval times. Small, tasty, slightly pineapple flavoured fruit. Resistant to scab. November to January but will sometimes keep to May in good storage conditions. Pollination group 5. Performs well in poor growing conditions

Crawley Beauty                                          
Cooker. Resistant to scab and canker. November to February. Becomes sweet late season. Pollination group 5. Sussex 1850

Dabinette                                           
Cider apple. Full bittersweet, astringent. Vintage quality. Resistant to scab. October to January. Pollination group 5. Regarded as one of the most reliable cider varieties. Somerset

D'Arcy Spice                                           
Spicy eater with hint of nutneg. Also good for juice production. Resistant to scab and canker Very long keeper. November to May. Pollination group 3. Performs well in coastal locations. Essex 1785

Discovery                                           
Eater. August. Possibly the tastiest of the early apples. Crisp with slight hint of strawberry. Bright red with pink coloured flesh. Does not keep. Homegrown ones are much tastier than the ones found in the shops. Pollination group 2/3. Essex 1949

Downton Pippin                                           
Eater. Sometimes used for cider. Small and juicy with intense flavour. September to October. Pollination group 2. Shropshire c1800.

Edward VII                                                   
Cooker (Golden Noble x Blenhein Orange). Makes good puree. Upright tree. Resistant to scab. November to March. Pollination group 5. Worcester 1906. Said to be suitable for forest gardens as survives with minimal pruning

Egremont Russet                                                    
Tasty eater. Resistant to scab and canker hence suitable for high rainfall areas. October to December. Pollination group 2. Sussex 19th Century

Fiesta                                                   
Popular eater, Cox's parentage. Aromatic sweet and crisp. Tree often has weeping form, ornamental. September or October, keeps till January. Pollination group 3. Kent 1972.

Gennet Moyle                                       
Cider apple. Bittersweet. Also used for cooking. Resistant to scab. Very strong grower. September to October. Pollination group 2. Triploid. Herefordshire 18th Century

Gladstone                                       
Very early eater once wider planted in Ireland. Large fruit sometimes prone to cracking. Scab and canker resistant. Raspberry flavour. August but sometimes ripens by late July. Pollination group 3. Worcester 1860

Golden Pippin                                       
Eater. Miniature russet with good resistance to scab and canker. Also used for cooking especially pies and for cider making. October to March. Pollination group 2. Origin unknown

Greensleeves                                                       
Eater. Resistant to scab and canker. Crisp and juicy. October to December. Good pollinator for other varieties. Pollination group 3. Kent 1966.

Grenadier                                                       
Reliable early cooker (James Grieve x Golden Delicious). Not a good keeper so needs to be used soon after picking. Very resistant to scab and canker so suitable for high rainfall areas. August/September. Good pollinator for other varieties. Pollination group 3. Buckinghamshire 1875

Harry Masters                                                        
Cider. Medium to full bittersweet. Vintage quality. Good cropper but can be biennial. Pollination group 5. Somerset 19th century.

Herefordshire Russet                                                        
Eater. Recent introduction, popular with organic growers. Aromatic, very good quality fruit, flavour similar to Cox. Reliable cropper. Pollination group 3. Kent 2002.

Katja (syn Katy)                                            
Tasty eater (James Grieve x  Worcester Pearmain). Very reliable cropper.  Also good for juicing and cider. Resistant to canker. September/October. Pollination group 3. Sweden 1947

Keswick Codlin                                        
Dual purpose. Very profuse in flower and good cropper. August to September.Very resistant to scab. Pollination group 1. Early flowering so may not be suitable for frost-prone areas. Cumbria 19th Century

Lane's Prince Albert                                       
Late cooker with striped appearance. Good in pies. Resistant to scab and canker so suitable for high rainfall areas. November to February. Pollination group 4 (but long flowering period so good pollinator for other varieties). Hertfordshire 1850

Laxton's Superb                                             
Sweet  juicy, aromatic eater (Wyken Pippen x Cox's Orange Pippin). Sometimes biennial. Susceptible to scab. November to January. Pollination group 4. Bedford 1897

Lemon Pippin                                       
Dual purpose. Juicy eater when fully ripe, with a hint of lemon flavour. Also good for tarts. Reputedly good for drying as does not discolour when cut. Resistant to scab. October to March. Pollination group 4. Normandy early 19th Century

Morgan's Sweet                                       
Cider. Pure sweet category. Sweet, juicy, sometimes used as an eater. Resistant to scab. September to October. Pollination group 3. Somerset 18th Century

Newton Wonder                                       
Cooker. Large juicy apple good for puree. Resistant to scab and canker. September to December. Pollination group 3/4. Derby 1870

Orleans Reinette                                       
Eater. Dry, sweet and aromatic. Good resistance to scab and canker. Also used for cooking (keeps shape when cooked). October. Pollination group 4. France 18th Century

Oslin                                       
Eater. Very old variety from Scotland, probably of French parentage.  Small fruit, aromatic, crisp and juicy, exceptional flavour tinged with aniseed. Somewhat prone to cracking so does not keep. August/September. Pollination group 2

Pitmaston Pineapple                                       
Conical fruit with rich pineapple flavour. Eater. Can be biennial. Resistant to scab. September to December. Pollination group 3.  Hereford 1785

Pixie                                      
Eater.Small attractive fruit, yellow flushed orange or red. Sweet, aromatic. Resistant to scab. October till March. Pollination group 4. Wisley 1947

Rajka                                      
Cooker but makes good eater when fully ripe. Small fruit but heavy cropper. Resistant to scab. Best in warm location. October. Pollination group 3. Czech republic

Red Devil                                       
Eater. Juicy, crisp, hint of strawberry. Very good flavour. Resistant to scab. October till December. Pollination group 2. Kent 1975

Red Pixie                                      
Eater. Red version of Pixie. Very attractive fruit, popular with children. Sweet, aromatic. Resistant to scab. October till March. Pollination group 4. 

Redsleeves                                       
Eater. Crisp juicy and sweet, slightly aromatic. Resistant to scab. Good cropper. September. Pollination group 3. Kent 1986

Rev W. Wilks                                       
Early cooker. Resistant to scab and canker. Recommended for high rainfall areas. When fully ripe can be used as an eater. August to October. Pollination group 2. Berkshire 1908

Ribston Pippin                                       
Eater. October to January. Juicy, firm, aromatic. Rich flavour. Very high in vitamin C (31mg/100g). Also good for cooking, juicing and cider. Can be susceptible to canker. Pollination group 2. Triploid. Originally raised in Yorkshire from pip imported from France c1707. Parent of Cox's Orange Pippin.

Rosemary Russet                                       
Eater. Aromatic with excellent flavour. Also used for juice production. Good resistance to scab and canker. October. Pollination group 3. Middlesex 1830

Ross non Pareil                                       
Eater. Intense flavoured russet grown in Ireland from a pip of French origin. Resistant to scab and canker. October to December. Pollination group 2. Rosslare, 18th Century.

St Edmund's Russet                                       
Eater. Sweet, juicy, very tasty with touch of pear flavour. Good resistance to scab and canker. Also used for juice and cider. September. Pollination group 2. Suffolk 1875

Sunset                                                            
Eater similar to Cox's Orange Pippin but hardier. Resistant to scab but can be susceptible to canker. October to December. Pollination group 3. Kent 1918.

Tom Putt                                        
Cooker. Vigorous. Also used for juice and cider (sharp). Very resistant to scab. September. Pollination group 3. Devon 18th Century

Tremlett's Bitter                                        
Cider. Full bittersweet. Slightly susceptible to scab. October. Pollination group 2. Devon 19th Century

Yarlington Mill                                           
Cider apple. Medium bittersweet, vintage quality. Resistant to canker. October to November. Pollination group 4. Somerset

Most varieties in stock but please enquiry before ordering

 

Crab apples

barerooted maidens €16.50 ea

Malus 'Harry Baker'                              
Large ruby red fruit with pink flesh. High in pectin. Ideal for crab apple jelly. Large ornamental pink flowers. Very attractive tree.

In stock

 

Delivery charges

1-2 trees                    €12.00
3-4 trees                    €15.00
5-7 trees                    €20.00
8-11 trees                  €25.00
12-20 trees                €30.00
Over 20 trees            €40.00

Orders may be also collected by arrangement from our premises in Westport.

 

Additional ordering information

Please use the printable order form provided or simply list the items on a sheet of paper. Add up the total, including carriage if applicable. Do not forget to include your own address and phone number. Payment should be by cheque postal order or bank draft, made payable to the Sustainability Institute.

The Sustainability Institute
Cooloughra
Ballinrobe Rd
Westport
Co. Mayo
Republic of Ireland

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